Week 2: Fullilove and Mezzadra

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Week 2: Fullilove and Mezzadra

Post by Yael on Fri Mar 23, 2018 1:15 pm

Dear Students,

Please keep in mind the question bellow as you work on the readings by Fullilove and Mezzadra
and post your reply bellow. As specified in class, please also reply to one response by another class member.

Question, Week 2:

How did the notion of Diaspora has changed in the last two decades? What are Fullilove and Mezzadra's
respective answers to this question?

Yael
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Re: Week 2: Fullilove and Mezzadra

Post by Music on Sun Mar 25, 2018 10:13 am

The excerpt from 'world wide webs: Diasporas and the International System' by Michael Fullilove talks about immigrants and migrants to, from and even back once again into their homelands; he unpacks the issue with regards to three main case studies: the Jewish Diaspora, the Israeli Diaspora, and the Turkish Diaspora. In his executive forward he defines diaspora as: “communities which live outside, but maintain links with, their homelands". It is important to highlight the link the immigrant possess with the homeland, as without this link, the person would not be considered part of the diaspora. He then notes that diasporas "are the human face of globalisation". The immigrant, says the author, usually falls between two chairs, as they lack a ground feeling of belonging; of anchored identity. The elasticity of their identity is "further stretched by the effects of globalisation"; immigrants hold dual or multiple overlapping identities. One interesting change that occurs when immigrants migrate is that identity becomes more situational rather than the hierarchal - as usual. Those people could switch between their multiple identities depending on the activity, location or company. Immigrants (or refugees) today are in the centre-stage of global issues, it is an archaic phenomena, however, it has eaten the spotlight recently after the World Wars, and the Cold War. The way in which diasporas are viewed by global eyes is evidently prone to change; the way in which diasporas view themselves is also malleable. "Alert to the need to keep pace with globalisation" homelands are consistently redefining emigrants, from runaways to potential friends. Home countries are reasserting the link between the homeland and the diaspora to claim more advantages.

The author further explains this complex in the aforementioned 3 case studies. Israel is a place that historically and demographically revolves around immigrations and migrations. The past two decades showed profound changes in the view of Israelis towards the Israeli Diaspora, becoming much more accepting rather than conscripting.

The other case study deals with the 2.5 million Turks who emigrated to Germany. Similarly, Turkish government used to dispraise these immigrants, but recently, efforts have been made to establish a closer relation with the diaspora, for religious and economic reasons.

World Policy in the West is increasingly changing upon the arrival of numerous multicultural immigrants. That brings us to the work of Italian Professor Sandrao Mezzadara. In the Right to Escape, the author writes about a few issues in regards to escapers. He talks about the stereotypes, prejudices, and prerogatives of the modern immigrant and how they are "dragged along and overwhelmed by the global mobilisation of capital". For instance, media coverage often uses cataclysmic terminology when dealing with refugees, like 'waves of migration' or 'flood-gates of migration'. The text deals with the more virulent aspects of immigration. All in all, the authors unveils how patriarchy exist even here, as women are disregarded and gender preference exists. Moreover, the author discusses the clash of the immigrant with the 'alien' world before them. Identities become flexible, labor becomes harder, welfare worse, and globalisation ruptures.

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Re: Week 2: Fullilove and Mezzadra

Post by 7ajje94 on Sun Mar 25, 2018 7:36 pm

Both writers Sandro Mezzadra and Michael Fullilove talked about how immigrants were treated unpleasantly by the people of their hometown. They considered them as antipatriotic and betrayers. However, the situiation changed because for example, the immigrants are achieving great development in many domains and as they always have a connection with their homeland, it will be beneficial that they can give enlightenment to their country, in addition to the proudness they are making. As far as I can say that it is like a compromise between the immigrants and the place they were born in. We can see in the text by Michael Fullilove how he described the situation of the Turks as an example of this.

In my opinion, considering humanity as an essential element to live an ethical life.
Migration is a solution for many complicated problems like wars, economical situation, weather conditions, political or religious reasons, etc.. and can also be a problem as some people have terroristic plans therefore it is very important to study the file and the behavior of the immigrant. Another problem is that million of people died trying to survive for the sake of ambition by immigrating in a dangerous way (by boats or even walking) because they did not get a visa permission for no reason or for their bad economical situation they are facing in their country. I believe that the organization of human rights should take a more serious actions about such tragical conditions..

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Reponse to "Music"

Post by Yael on Sun Mar 25, 2018 7:58 pm

[quote="Music"]

"All in all, the authors unveils how patriarchy exist even here, as women are disregarded and gender preference exists."  

Great job, "Music!"
I wanted to draw your attention to how this situation appears in Mezzadra's analysis; it can enable us to discern refugees' agency.
Female refugees escape their homeland because of various reasons including life dangers. At the same time, they manage to express their needs and agendas of evading patriarchy in that act of escape.

Yael

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Response to 7ajje94

Post by Yael on Sun Mar 25, 2018 8:02 pm

[quote="7ajje94"]
However, the situiation changed because for example, the immigrants are achieving great development in many domains and as they always have a connection with their homeland, it will be beneficial that they can give enlightenment to their country, in addition to the proudness they are making. As far as I can say that it is like a compromise between the immigrants and the place they were born in. We can see in the text by Michael Fullilove how he described the situation of the Turks as an example of this.

Interesting perspective. Do you take this to be the case with Mezzadra's analysis as well?

Yael

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Re: Week 2: Fullilove and Mezzadra

Post by TA on Sun Mar 25, 2018 10:49 pm

I reply for me and Mohamed,

In the late years especially since 2001 9/11, and the following terror attacks (Bali-2002-2005, Madrid 2004 and London 2005) and of course some of the recent years by ISIS there is an up-growing movement of diasporaphobia. If before in the 80's for example immigrants were treated relatively well, in the last recent years there is a component of suspicion and also racism towards new and deferent groups in the society. This has also been used and manipulate by politicians. Moreover this creates basically even stronger diaspora.

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Re: Week 2: Fullilove and Mezzadra

Post by Music on Mon Mar 26, 2018 9:19 am

"Moreover this creates basically even stronger diaspora".

I am quite curious about what you mean with 'stronger diaspora'. I expect you mean an increase in the number but it is interesting to link the notion of diaspora with strength. Especially after reading those texts. Today diasporas are a constantly changing body. Some are assimilating, some are integrating, some are building a stronger link with the homelands, and some are even 'immigrating' back. It makes me wonder where do I fall in the image of diaspora? How can I pick up myself from 'in between two chairs'?

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